Exhibition

in Biel/Bienne / Switzerland
04.07.2021 - 29.08.2021 00:00
Emilija Škarnulytė - Sunken Cities

“Hold your breath. Drop. Dive. Open your eyes. Leave your body at the surface. You are now all eye, like a drill; all tail, like a fish. What are you trying to extract, to mine from your cool liquid entry? You pass, cool as a camera with your lens of language, through dry corridors of nuclear seas, liquid hallways of sunken cities, strange scaffolding of deep-sea mining, sculptural figures of destroyed empires. Your dry eye reaches for: Mosaics of the sea floor or mosaics of the control room; a body slithering, snakelike, over its nuclear control panels. Elsewhere, in another deep, jellyfish are loose and luminescent and labouring as flowers articulating the black. Architectures rise like language inside you, lean and lucid or marmoreal and voluptuous, each writ across the wet pages of southern bodies of water, dry pages of northern bodies of tundra. […]

Who brought you here? Some mermaid archaeologist, some modern undine, some artist-as-siren-as-museum guide. Some body as soundwave, as cognition only. What cities are sunk deep inside you? […] Mosaic, neoprene, saline, chlorophyll, oil, mineral, sex, empire, bivalves, shifting tectonic plates, shifting desires, some ancient volcanic basin. […] You are not pillaging the sunken city, though, you are swimming it. Now count before you go deeper into it: one, two, three, four, five—now go.” (Quinn Latimer on Emilija Škarnulytė’s “Sunken Cities”, 2021)

Emilija Škarnulytė (b. 1987, Vilnius, Lithuania) is a visual artist and film-maker. She researches the psychological power wielded on us by our environment. Her videos and multi-media installations, which interweave fiction with documentary films, reflect the invisible relationships between the physical world and our social power of imagination – from the perception of geological time and its influence on our relationship to history to the way in which immense conflicts inscribe themselves in the structure of the Earth. For the exhibition at the Kunsthaus Pasquart she has created an immersive video-sound-landscape that runs through all the spaces of the first level. The second part of the display includes new productions and existing works that reflect on the artist’s career as she has engaged with various narratives, materials and techniques. Alongside video works objects, photography and mosaics complement the exhibition.

In Škarnulytė’s films of the last few years places often appear in which contemporary political issues are negotiated, fluctuating between human and non-human worlds and erasing the boundaries between geological, ecological and cosmic powers. She touches on fundamental problems of our historic period: climate change and the future of humankind. She confronts these with the filmic exploration of varied narratives, which at the same time remain open but merge with one other. The artist takes herself on a search for truth, showing us an anthology composed of different histories. Škarnulytė’s poetic stagings leave behind a feeling of contemplative anxiety, generated by the encounter with everything that is larger than us, larger than life – a threatening climate catastrophe, natural phenomena, ideological constructions, gigantic scientific (infra)structures and human knowledge that leave indelible inscriptions and scars on the planet.

With “Sunken Cities” (2021), Emilija Škarnulytė creates an immersive film environment in the Galeries, in which the different rooms function as a time-line. She produces the effect of total immersion in a multi-dimensional landscape in which our gaze is duplicated by the mirrored ceiling and we simultaneously become witnesses of a future, contemporary and past world. The artist opens the perspective with this black, reflective surface, allowing us to experience it as a visual horizon that looks like an ocean of liquid oil. A thin line above and below water that separates the real and the quantum. Within this algid landscape, devoid of humans, appears the ancient, mythological figure of the siren. Roger Penrose, one of the best-known theoretical physicists of our time, described the mermaid in one of his inter-disciplinary texts as the representative of the magic and the mystery of quantum mechanics. Like water, she exists in various aggregate conditions, consisting of molecules that change and spread. She takes many guises: is human and simultaneously fish, a cyborg, a machine. Škarnulytė confronts these disused technological structures, shrouded in myths, and abandoned places marked by decay with this deeply symbolic figure as a counter-myth. The mermaid appears here as an intermediary between nature and technology, between human and non-humanoid creatures. She gives the impression of returning from the future to the planet, in order to explore these sunken cities and technological ruins. It is a retro-futuristic view of our planet, a perspective from another time, in which the human race has already become extinct and nature has taken over. Or as Škarnulytė expresses it: “the ruins of human activity seen from a distant future”.

On the second floor of Kunsthaus Pasquart Emilija Škarnulytė is showing films that investigate singular moments in time and space. With mythologies in mind, the artist takes us to the edge of warring civilizations, under the northern lights near the magnetic pole, at nuclear power plants and mystical deserts where space travellers play saxophones in scintillating robes and concoct curved utopic spaceships. She watches a grandmother blinded by nuclear meltdown touch with her hands the monuments of the fallen empire that caused it and with her ally Tanya Busse in their duo New Mineral Collective proposes pleasure as a revolt against extractivism.

Curator of the exhibition Stefanie Gschwend, Associate Curator Kunsthaus Pasquart

On the occasion of the exhibition the publication “Emilija Škarnulytė. Sirenomelia” with texts by Andrew Berardini, Sir Roger Penrose, Nadim Samman and Alison Sperling will be published by Sternberg Press (ENG).

Opening hours Tues/Wed/Fri 12 – 6 pm, Thur 12 – 7 pm, Sat 11 am – 6 pm, Mon & Sun closed

“Hold your breath. Drop. Dive. Open your eyes. Leave your body at the surface. You are now all eye, like a drill; all tail, like a fish. What are you trying to extract, to mine from your cool liquid entry? You pass, cool as a camera with your lens of language, through dry corridors of nuclear seas, liquid hallways of sunken cities, strange scaffolding of deep-sea mining, sculptural figures of destroyed empires. Your dry eye reaches for: Mosaics of the sea floor or mosaics of the control room; a body slithering, snakelike, over its nuclear control panels. Elsewhere, in another deep, jellyfish are loose and luminescent and labouring as flowers articulating the black. Architectures rise like language inside you, lean and lucid or marmoreal and voluptuous, each writ across the wet pages of southern bodies of water, dry pages of northern bodies of tundra. […]

Who brought you here? Some mermaid archaeologist, some modern undine, some artist-as- siren-as-museum guide. Some body as soundwave, as cognition only. What cities are sunk deep inside you? […] Mosaic, neoprene, saline, chlorophyll, oil, mineral, sex, empire, bivalves, shifting tectonic plates, shifting desires, some ancient volcanic basin. […] You are not pillaging the sunken city, though, you are swimming it. Now count before you go deeper into it: one, two, three, four, five—now go.” (Quinn Latimer on Emilija Škarnulytė’s “Sunken Cities”, 2021)

Emilija Škarnulytė (*1987, Vilnius, Lituanie) est une artiste visuelle et cinéaste. Elle sonde l’impact psychologique que notre environnement produit sur nous. Ses vidéos et installations multimédias, qui enchevêtrent la fiction et le documentaire, représentent les relations invisibles existant entre le monde physique et notre imaginaire social – depuis la manière dont nous percevons le temps géologique et l’influence que cela a sur notre rapport à l’histoire, jusqu’à la façon dont les violents conflits humains finissent par s’inscrire sur la structure même de la terre. Pour l’exposition au Centre d’art Pasquart, l’artiste conçoit un paysage audiovisuel immersif qui se déploie dans toutes les salles des Galeries. Dans l’ancien bâtiment, de nouvelles productions et des œuvres existantes explorant de nouveaux matériaux, techniques et narrations reflètent la carrière de l’artiste. Outre des vidéos, des objets, des photographies et des mosaïques seront également présentés.

Dans les films de Škarnulytė de ces dernières années émergent souvent des lieux où sont négociées des thématiques politiques contemporaines qui oscillent entre les mondes humains et non humains, brouillant les frontières entre les forces géologiques, écologiques et cosmiques. Škarnulytė aborde les problématiques fondamentales de notre période historique; le changement climatique et l’avenir de notre espèce. Elle les confronte à l’analyse cinématographique de multiples récits qui à la fois restent ouverts et tendent à se confondre. L’artiste se lance dans une quête de vérité et nous montre une anthologie composée de différentes histoires. Les mises en scène poétiques de Škarnulytės nous laissent avec un sentiment d’angoisse contemplative, provoquée par la rencontre avec tout ce qui est plus grand que nous, plus grand que la vie – une catastrophe climatique imminente, des phénomènes naturels, des constructions idéologiques, de gigantesques (infra)structures scientifiques et des connaissances humaines qui laissent des inscriptions et des cicatrices indélébiles sur la planète.

Avec “Sunken Cities” (2021), Emilija Škarnulytė crée dans les Galeries un environnement filmique immersif où les différentes salles sont reliées de façon chronologique. Elle crée l’effet d’une plongée totale dans un paysage multidimensionnel où notre regard se dédouble grâce aux plafonds en miroir et où nous sommes simultanément témoins d’un monde futur, présent et passé. L’artiste ouvre la perspective avec cette surface noire réfléchissante et nous amène à la vivre comme un horizon visuel agissant à la manière d’un océan d’huile liquide. Une fine ligne au-dessus et au-dessous de l’eau sépare le réel et le quantique. Au sein de ces paysages algides et déserts surgit l’ancienne figure mythologique de la sirène. Dans l’un de ses écrits interdisciplinaires, Roger Penrose, l’un des plus célèbres physiciens théoriciens de notre époque, a décrit la sirène comme représentant la magie et le mystère de la mécanique quantique. Comme l’eau, elle existe dans différents états d’agrégation, composée de molécules qui se modifient et se dilatent. Elle est multiforme; à la fois humaine et poisson, elle est un cyborg, elle est une machine. Škarnulytė confronte des structures technologiques désaffectés, entourés de mythes, et des lieux abandonnés, marqués par la décadence, avec cette figure symbolique comme contre-mythe. La sirène s’avère ici comme une médiatrice entre la nature et la technologie, entre les créatures humaines et non humanoïdes. Elle donne l’impression d’être revenue du futur sur la planète pour explorer ces villes englouties et ces ruines technologiques. Il s’agit d’un regard rétro-futuriste sur notre planète, la perspective d’une époque où les humains ont déjà disparu et où la nature a pris le dessus. Ou, comme le dit Škarnulytė elle-même: ce sont “les ruines de l’activité humaine vues depuis un futur lointain”.

Au deuxième étage du Centre d’art Pasquart, Emilija Škarnulytė présente des films qui examinent des moments singuliers dans le temps et l’espace. Avec des mythologies à l’esprit, l’artiste nous emmène aux confins de civilisations en guerre, sous les aurores boréales près du pôle magnétique, dans des centrales nucléaires et des déserts mystiques où des voyageurs de l’espace jouent du saxophone dans des robes scintillantes et fabriquent d’utopiques vaisseaux incurvés. Elle regarde une grand-mère, rendue aveugle par une catastrophe nucléaire, toucher de ses mains les monuments de cet ancien empire soviétique, celui-là même qui a causé sa cécité. Avec son alliée Tanya Busse, dans leur duo New Mineral Collective, Škarnulytė étudie le plaisir comme perspective de révolte contre l’extractivisme.

Commissaire de l’exposition Stefanie Gschwend, collaboratrice scientifique au Centre d’art Pasquart

À l’occasion de l’exposition, la publication “Emilija Škarnulytė. Sirenomelia” paraît aux éditions Sternberg Press, avec des textes d’Andrew Berardini, Sir Roger Penrose, Nadim Samman et Alison Sperling (ENG).

Heures d’ouverture Mardi/Mercredi/Vendredi 12:00 – 18:00, Jeudi 12:00 – 19:00, Samedi 11:00 – 18:00, Lundi & Dimance fermé

“Hold your breath. Drop. Dive. Open your eyes. Leave your body at the surface. You are now all eye, like a drill; all tail, like a fish. What are you trying to extract, to mine from your cool liquid entry? You pass, cool as a camera with your lens of language, through dry corridors of nuclear seas, liquid hallways of sunken cities, strange scaffolding of deep-sea mining, sculptural figures of destroyed empires. Your dry eye reaches for: Mosaics of the sea floor or mosaics of the control room; a body slithering, snakelike, over its nuclear control panels. Elsewhere, in another deep, jellyfish are loose and luminescent and labouring as flowers articulating the black. Architectures rise like language inside you, lean and lucid or marmoreal and voluptuous, each writ across the wet pages of southern bodies of water, dry pages of northern bodies of tundra. […]

Who brought you here? Some mermaid archaeologist, some modern undine, some artist-as- siren-as-museum guide. Some body as soundwave, as cognition only. What cities are sunk deep inside you? […] Mosaic, neoprene, saline, chlorophyll, oil, mineral, sex, empire, bivalves, shifting tectonic plates, shifting desires, some ancient volcanic basin. […] You are not pillaging the sunken city, though, you are swimming it. Now count before you go deeper into it: one, two, three, four, five—now go.” (Quinn Latimer on Emilija Škarnulytė’s “Sunken Cities”, 2021)

Emilija Škarnulytė (*1987, Vilnius, Litauen) ist bildende Künstlerin und Filmemacherin. Sie erforscht die psychologische Kraft, welche unsere Umwelt auf uns ausübt. Ihre Videos und Multimedia-Installationen, die Fiktion mit Dokumentarfilmen verflechten, reflektieren die unsichtbaren Beziehungen zwischen der physischen Welt und unserem sozialen Vorstellungsvermögen – von der Wahrnehmung der geologischen Zeit und ihrem Einfluss auf unser Verhältnis zur Geschichte bis hin zur Art und Weise, wie sich gewaltsame Konflikte in die Struktur der Erde einschreiben. Für die Ausstellung im Kunsthaus Pasquart schafft sie eine immersive Video-Sound-Landschaft, die sich über alle Räume des Neubaus erstreckt. In den Altbauräumen wird die Karriere der Künstlerin mit neuen Produktionen und bestehenden Werken reflektiert, die verschiedene Narrative, Materialien und Techniken untersuchen. Neben Videoarbeiten werden Objekte, Fotografien und Mosaik gezeigt.

In Škarnulytės Filmen der letzten Jahre tauchen oftmals Orte auf, an denen zeitgenössische politische Themen verhandelt werden, die zwischen menschlichen und nicht-menschlichen Welten schwanken und welche die Grenzen zwischen geologischen, ökologischen und kosmischen Kräften verwischen. Sie berührt grundlegende Problematiken unserer historischen Periode; den Klimawandel und die Zukunft unserer Spezies. Diesen begegnet sie mit dem filmischen Abtasten vielfältiger Narrative, die zugleich offenbleiben und doch miteinander verschmelzen. Die Künstlerin begibt sich auf Wahrheitssuche und zeigt uns eine Anthologie, die sich aus verschiedenen Geschichten zusammensetzt. Škarnulytės poetische Inszenierungen hinterlassen ein Gefühl kontemplativer Beklemmung, hervorgerufen durch die Begegnung mit allem, was grösser ist als wir, grösser als das Leben – eine drohende Klimakatastrophe, Naturphänomene, ideologische Konstruktionen, gigantische wissenschaftliche (Infra)Strukturen und menschliches Wissen, die unauslöschliche Einschreibungen und Narben auf dem Planeten hinterlassen.

In den Galerien kreiert Emilija Škarnulytė mit “Sunken Cities” (2021) eine immersive Filmumgebung, wobei die verschiedenen Räume als Zeitlinie funktionieren. Sie schafft den Effekt des völligen Eintauchens in eine mehrdimensionale Landschaft, in der sich unser Blick durch die verspiegelten Decken verdoppelt und wir gleichzeitig Zeug*in einer zukünftigen, gegenwärtigen und vergangenen Welt werden. Die Künstlerin öffnet die Perspektive mit dieser schwarzen, reflektierenden Oberfläche und lässt sie uns als visuellen Horizont erleben, der wirkt wie ein Ozean aus flüssigem Öl. Eine dünne Linie über und unter Wasser, die das Reale und das Quantum trennt. Innerhalb dieser algiden und menschenleeren Landschaften taucht die uralte mythologische Figur der Sirene auf. Roger Penrose, einer der bekanntesten theoretischen Physiker unserer Zeit, hat in einer seiner interdisziplinären Schriften die Meerjungfrau als Repräsentantin der Magie und des Mysteriums der Quantenmechanik beschrieben. Sie existiert wie Wasser in verschiedenen Aggregatzuständen, bestehend aus Molekülen, die sich verändern und ausdehnen. Sie ist vielgestaltig; ist menschlich und gleichzeitig Fisch, ist ein Cyborg, ist eine Maschine. Škarnulytė begegnet diesen von Mythen umwobenen stillgelegten technologischen Strukturen und verlassenen, von Zerfall gezeichneten Orten mit dieser symbolträchtigen Figur als Gegenmythos. Die Meerjungfrau tritt hier als Vermittlerin zwischen Natur und Technik auf, zwischen menschlich und non-humanoiden Geschöpfen. Sie erweckt den Eindruck, dass sie aus der Zukunft auf den Planeten zurückgekehrt ist, um diese versunkenen Städte und technologischen Ruinen zu erkunden. Es ist ein retro-futuristischer Blick auf unseren Planeten, eine Perspektive aus einer Zeit, in der die Menschen bereits ausgestorben sind und die Natur die Macht übernommen hat. Oder wie Škarnulytė es ausdrückt: “die Ruinen der menschlichen Aktivität aus einer fernen Zukunft gesehen”.

Im zweiten Teil der Ausstellung zeigt Emilija Škarnulytė Filme, die singuläre Momente in Zeit und Raum untersuchen. Mit Mythologien im Sinne, führt uns Skarnulyte an den Rand sich bekriegender Zivilisationen, unter die Nordlichter in der Nähe des Magnetpols, in Atomkraftwerke und mystische Wüsten, wo Raumfahrer in schillernden Gewändern Saxophon spielen und utopische geschwungene Raumschiffe basteln. Sie beobachtet ihre von der Kernschmelze erblindete Großmutter dabei, wie sie mit den Händen die Oberflächen der Denkmäler des untergegangenen sowjetischen Imperiums abtastet, das die Blindheit verursacht hat, und prospektiert in ihrem Duo New Mineral Collective mit ihrer Weggefährtin Tanya Busse das Vergnügen als Revolte gegen Extraktivismus.

Kuratorin der Ausstellung Stefanie Gschwend, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin Kunsthaus Pasquart

Anlässlich der Ausstellung erscheint die Publikation “Emilija Škarnulytė. Sirenomelia” mit Texten von Andrew Berardini, Sir Roger Penrose, Nadim Samman, Alison Sperling, Verlag Sternberg Press (ENG).

Öffnungszeiten Di/Mi/Fr 12 – 18 Uhr, Do 12 – 19 Uhr, Sa 11 – 18 Uhr, Montag und Sonntag geschlossen

www.pasquart.ch

Location:
Kunsthaus Centre d’art Pasquart
Seevorstadt 71 Faubourg du Lac
2502 Biel/Bienne
Switzerland

0 Comments

Leave a reply

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

© likeyou artnetwork / www.likeyou.com / Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account