Exhibition

in Aarau / Switzerland
28.08.2016 - 13.11.2016 10:00 - 17:00
Karl Ballmer - Head and Heart

In the 1930s, the Aarau painter and writer Karl Ballmer (1891-1958) was among the leading avant-garde artists of the Hamburg Secession. A successful artist, he was defamed by the National Socialists as a “degenerate” artist in 1937 and thus forced to return to Switzerland. Today, a quarter century after his last retrospective, the Aargauer Kunsthaus is remembering the artist by devoting a comprehensive exhibition to his both analytical and sensitive oeuvre.

Born in Aarau, Karl Ballmer is firmly anchored in the history of the Aargauer Kunsthaus: in 1960, two years after Ballmer’s death, Guido Fischer, the first curator of the Aargauer Kunsthaus, presented the work of the artist to the public in a comprehensive retrospective. Thirty years later, the museum’s then director, Beat Wismer, provided a more in-depth understanding of Ballmer’s oeuvre in the monographic exhibition “Karl Ballmer. Head and Heart”. The Karl Ballmer Foundation, which was founded at the time, administered Ballmer’s artistic estate and placed the almost 200 paintings and works on paper with the collection of the Aargauer Kunsthaus as a permanent loan – a body of work on which the Kunsthaus draws to this day for collection presentations and group exhibitions such “Docking Station” (2014) and “Auf der Grenze” (2015).

Twenty-six years after the last retrospective, the Aargauer Kunsthaus now presents an exhibition titled “Karl Ballmer. Head and Heart”, which brings the artist back into our visual memory and introduces him to a new generation of museum goers. In March 2017, the exhibition will travel in a more streamlined form to the Ernst Barlach Haus in Hamburg, thereby resituating the artist in his adopted home town and one-time main place of activity.

Karl Ballmer was born in Aarau, Switzerland, in 1891. After training as a draughtsman, he worked for several years as a graphic artist. At the same time he also devoted himself to philosophy and to writing. After meeting Rudolf Steiner 1918, he reflected critically on the approaches of anthroposophy in lectures and writings. The most formative period for his work was his time in Hamburg from 1922 until 1938. As a member of the Hamburg Secession, Ballmer was among the city’s leading avant-garde artists. In sensitive portraits as well as in complex landscape and figure paintings he pursued a type of painting in which the essence hidden behind outward appearances is expressed. A successful artist, he was defamed as a “degenerate” artist by the Nazis in 1937 and consequently forced to return to Switzerland. In Ticino, his final place of exile and creative production, he developed his late work as an author and painter.

The exhibition “Karl Ballmer. Head and Heart” examines the artist’s various creative stages whilst taking art historical analyses and most recent research findings into account. More than one hundred paintings and works on paper from the collection enter into a dialogue with forty top-class loans from private collections as well as from German and Swiss museums: Nordic cityscapes and landscapes meet paintings and drawings of figures; pastel-coloured paintings are superseded by the dark-hued late work. The “head” is a subject that is explored in many variations in prints, pencil drawings and oil paintings. Original documents from the Aargau state archive, which administers the writings from Ballmer’s estate, provide deeper insights into the artistic and art-political environment surrounding Karl Ballmer.

An accompanying publication of the same title provides the theoretical foundation for the exhibition. Accompanied by rich illustrations, essays by experts bring out central themes: based on historical sources, the painter is described and situated within his professional and social milieu. The focus is on Ballmer’s connections to the artists of the Hamburg Secession, the writer Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) and the philosopher Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) as well as to Max Sauerland (1880-1934), the then director of the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg who was his most important patron. Particular attention is paid to Ballmer’s critical study of anthroposophy, while new scholarly insights shine a light on the controversial relationship the artist maintained before and after the war with the art collector Hildebrand Gurlitt (1895-1956).

Karl Ballmer (b. 1891, Aarau, Canton of Aargau – 1958, Limone, Canton of Ticino). After training as a draughtsman, he attended the Basel School of Applied Arts (1909) and the art academy in Munich (1910-1911). Interrupted by stints in the military, he worked as an independent graphic artist in Bern and Zürich until 1913. In 1918, he met Rudolf Steiner who had a formative influence on him particularly in his writings. From 1922 until 1938 he lived in Hamburg where he joined the Hamburg Secession in 1932. In 1938 he moved with his wife, Katharina van Cleef (d. 1970) to Basel and subsequently to the Canton of Ticino. There he lived in intellectual and artistic seclusion. On 7 September 1958 he died in a clinic in Lugano.

Selected Solo Exhibitions
“Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958). Der Maler”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1990)/ Niebüll, Richard-Haizmann-Museum (1990)/ Warth, Kunstmuseum Kartause Ittingen (1991); “Karl Ballmer. Oelbilder, Zeichnungen, Gouachen, Collagen und Monotypien”, Helmhaus, Zürich (1977); “Bilder und Gouachen. Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958)”, Galerie Palette, Zürich (1968); “Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958). Erwin Rehmann”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1960); solo exhibition at Galerie d’art moderne, Basel (1964); solo exhibition at Gurlitt, Hamburg (1935)

Selected Group Exhibitions
“Auf der Grenze”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2015); “Docking Station. Zeitgenössische Künstler/innen arbeiten mit Werken aus dem Aargauer Kunsthaus”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2014); “Stille Reserven. Schweizer Malerei 1850 – 1950”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2013); “Schweizer Meister. Swiss Masters”, Kunstmuseum Luzern (2008); “Geflohen aus Deutschland. Hamburger Künstler im Exil 1933-1945”, Museum für Hamburgische Geschichte, Hamburg (2007); “Eine Revolution des Formgefühls. “Karl Ballmer – Richard Haizmann” – Rolf Nesch in Hamburg”, Hamburger Kunsthalle/Galerie 1 der Hamburger Sparkasse, Hamburg (2005); “Die Sammlung Hermann-Josef. Bunte. Deutsche Malerei des 20. Jahrhunderts”, Hamburger Kunsthalle/Galerien der Haspa Hamburg/ Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven (1999/2000); “Outside. Streiflichter auf die moderne Schweizer Kunst”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1981); “Outside”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1976); “Karl Ballmer – Richard Haizmann”, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg (1957); “12. Ausstellung der Hamburgischen Sezession” (closed by the National-Socialists), “Jüngerer Hamburger Kunst”, Kunstverein Köln, Cologne (1932)

Curator: Thomas Schmutz, Deputy Director / Curator
Curatorial Assistant: Julia Schallberger, Assistant Curator

Publication: “Karl Ballmer. Kopf und Herz”, edited by Thomas Schmutz and the Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau / Karsten Müller and the Ernst Barlach Haus, Hamburg. Exh. cat. Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau and Ernst Barlach Haus, Hamburg. Published by Scheidegger & Spiess AG Zürich, 2016.

The richly illustrated, German-language catalogue published in conjunction with the exhibition includes essays by Carolin Lange, Thomas Hunkeler, Rüdiger Joppien, Ulrich Kaiser, Peter Suter, Thomas Schmutz and Friederike Weimar as well as an introduction by Madeleine Schuppli and Karsten Müller. Anne Hoffmann Graphic Design, Zürich, is responsible for the graphic design of the 200-page volume.

Opening hours Tues-Sun 10 am – 5 pm, Thur 10 am – 8 pm

Der Aarauer Maler und Schriftsteller Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958) zählt in den 1930er-Jahren zu den führenden Avantgardekünstlern der Hamburgischen Sezession. Künstlerisch erfolgreich, wird er 1937 von den Nationalsozialisten als “entarteter” Künstler diffamiert und damit gezwungen, in die Schweiz zurückzukehren. Heute, ein Vierteljahrhundert nach der letzten Retrospektive, ruft das Aargauer Kunsthaus den Künstler ins Gedächtnis und widmet dem analytischen und zugleich empfindsamen Œuvre eine umfassende Einzelausstellung.

Der Aarauer Maler und Schriftsteller Karl Ballmer ist in der Geschichte des Aargauer Kunsthauses stark verankert: 1960, zwei Jahre nach dem Tod von Karl Ballmer stellte Guido Fischer, der erste Konservator des Aargauer Kunsthauses, das Schaffen des Künstlers in einer umfassenden Retrospektive der Öffentlichkeit vor. Dreissig Jahre später sorgte der damalige Direktor, Beat Wismer, mit der monografischen Ausstellung “Karl Ballmer. Der Maler”, für ein vertieftes Verständnis von Ballmers Œuvre. Die damals gegründete Karl Ballmer-Stiftung nahm sich der Verwaltung von Ballmers künstlerischem Nachlass an und gab die fast 200 Gemälde und Papierarbeiten als Dauerleihgabe in die Sammlung des Aargauer Kunsthauses – ein Werkkorpus, aus dem das Kunsthaus bis heute für Sammlungs- und Gruppenausstellungen wie “Docking Station” (2014)oder “Auf der Grenze” (2015) schöpft.

26 Jahre nach der letzten Retrospektive richtet nun das Aargauer Kunsthaus unter dem Titel “Karl Ballmer. Kopf und Herz” eine Einzelausstellung aus, die den Künstler ins visuelle Gedächtnis ruft und einer neuen Publikumsgeneration vorstellt. Im März 2017 wird die Ausstellung in gestraffter Form an das Ernst Barlach Haus in Hamburg weiterziehen und den Künstler damit in seiner Wahlheimat und einst wichtigsten Wirkungsstätte verorten.

Karl Ballmer kommt 1891 in Aarau (CH) zur Welt. Nach seiner Ausbildung zum Zeichner arbeitet er mehrere Jahre als Grafiker. Daneben widmet er sich der Philosophie und Schriftstellerei. Seit seiner Begegnung mit Rudolf Steiner 1918 setzt er sich kritisch-reflektierend in Vorträgen und Schriften mit den Ansätzen der Anthroposophie auseinander. Die für sein Schaffen prägendste Zeit bilden die Hamburger Jahre zwischen 1922 und 1938. Als Mitglied der Hamburgischen Sezession zählt Karl Ballmer in den 1930er-Jahren zu den führenden Avantgardekünstlern der Hansestadt. In empfindsamen Bildnissen wie auch komplexen Landschafts- und Figurenbildern strebt er nach einer Malerei, die ihren hinter der äusseren Erscheinung verborgenen Wesenskern zum Ausdruck bringt. Künstlerisch erfolgreich, wird er 1937 von den Nationalsozialisten als “entarteter” Künstler diffamiert und damit gezwungen, in die Schweiz zurückzukehren. Sein schriftliches und malerisches Spätwerk entwickelt er im Tessin, seinem letzten Exil- und Schaffensort. Der Anschluss an die internationale Kunstszene mag ihm aber bis zu seinem Tod 1958 nicht mehr gelingen.

Die Ausstellung “Karl Ballmer. Kopf und Herz” blickt vor dem Hintergrund kunsthistorischer Analysen und jüngster Forschungsergebnisse auf die verschiedenen Schaffensphasen des Künstlers. Über hundert Gemälde und Papierarbeiten aus der eigenen Sammlung treten in Dialog mit vierzig hochkarätigen Leihnahmen aus Privatbesitz und aus Deutschen wie Schweizer Museen: Nordische Stadt- und Landschaftsdarstellungen begegnen zergliederten Figurendarstellungen. Gemälde von pastellener Farbigkeit werden durch das dunkeltonige Spätœuvre abgelöst. Mannigfaltig wird das Thema das “Kopfes” in Druckgrafiken, Bleistiftzeichnungen und Ölgemälden durchgespielt. Originaldokumente aus dem Staatsarchiv Aargau, welches den schriftlichen Nachlass Ballmers betreut, gewähren vertiefte Einblicke in das künstlerische und kunstpolitische Umfeld, in dem sich Karl Ballmer bewegte.

Den theoretischen Unterbau zur Ausstellung liefert die gleichnamige Begleitpublikation. Von einer reichen Bildstrecke begleitet, setzen Expertenessays thematische Schwerpunkte: Basierend auf historischen Quellen wird der Maler in seinem beruflichen und sozialen Umfeld beschrieben und eingeordnet. Im Fokus stehen Ballmers Beziehungen zum Kreis der Hamburgischen Sezession, zu den Autoren und Philosophen Samuel Beckett (1906 – 1989) und Rudolf Steiner (1861 – 1925) sowie zu Max Sauerland (1880 – 1934), seinem wichtigsten Förderer, dem damaligen Leiter des Museums für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg. Ein besonderes Augenmerk liegt zudem auf der kritischen Auseinandersetzung Ballmers mit der Anthroposophie, während neuewissenschaftliche Errungenschaften die umstrittene Beziehung beleuchten, die der Künstler vor und nach dem Krieg zu dem Kunstsammler Hildebrand Gurlitt (1895 – 1956) pflegte.

Karl Ballmer (*1891, Aarau, AG – 1958, Limone, TI) nach seiner Ausbildung zum Zeichner studiert er an der Kunstgewerbeschule Basel (1909) und der Kunstakademie in München (1910 – 1911). Unterbrochen von Zeiten des Militärdienstes, arbeitet er bis 1913 als freier Grafiker in Bern und Zürich. 1918 lernt er Rudolf Steiner kennen, der ihn vor allem in seinem schriftstellerischen Schaffen prägt. 1922 – 1938 lebt er in Hamburg, wo er 1932 der Hamburgischen Sezession beitritt. 1938 übersiedelt er zusammen mit seiner Frau Katharina van Cleef († 1970) nach Basel, danach ins Tessin. Dort lebt er in intellektueller und künstlerischer Abgeschiedenheit. Am 7. September 1958 stirbt er in einer Klinik in Lugano.

Einzelausstellungen (Auswahl)
“Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958). Der Maler”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1990)/ Niebüll, Richard-Haizmann-Museum (1990)/ Warth, Kunstmuseum Kartause Ittingen (1991); “Karl Ballmer. Oelbilder, Zeichnungen, Gouachen, Collagen und Monotypien”, Helmhaus, Zürich (1977); “Bilder und Gouachen. Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958)”, Galerie Palette, Zürich (1968); “Karl Ballmer (1891 – 1958). Erwin Rehmann”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1960); Einzelausstellung in der Galerie d’art moderne, Basel (1964); Einzelausstellung im Kunstkabinett Gurlitt, Hamburg (1935)

Gruppenausstellungen (Auswahl)
“Auf der Grenze”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2015); “Docking Station. Zeitgenössische Künstler/innen arbeiten mit Werken aus dem Aargauer Kunsthaus”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2014); “Stille Reserven. Schweizer Malerei 1850 – 1950”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2013); “Schweizer Meister. Swiss Masters”, Kunstmuseum Luzern (2008); “Geflohen aus Deutschland. Hamburger Künstler im Exil 1933-1945”, Museum für Hamburgische Geschichte, Hamburg (2007); “Eine Revolution des Formgefühls. “Karl Ballmer – Richard Haizmann” – Rolf Nesch in Hamburg”, Hamburger Kunsthalle/Galerie 1 der Hamburger Sparkasse, Hamburg (2005); “Die Sammlung Hermann-Josef. Bunte. Deutsche Malerei des 20. Jahrhunderts”, Hamburger Kunsthalle/Galerien der Haspa Hamburg/ Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven (1999/2000); “Outside. Streiflichter auf die moderne Schweizer Kunst”, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1981); Outside, Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (1976); “Karl Ballmer – Richard Haizmann”, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg (1957); “12. Ausstellung der Hamburgischen Sezession” (wurde von den Nationalsozialisten geschlossen), “Jüngerer Hamburger Kunst”, Kunstverein Köln (1932)

Kurator: Thomas Schmutz, Stv. Direktor / Kurator
Kuratorische Assistenz: Julia Schallberger, Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin

Publikation: “Karl Ballmer. Kopf und Herz”, hrsg. von Thomas Schmutz und Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau / Karsten Müller und Ernst Barlach Haus, Hamburg, Ausst.-Kat., Aarau/Hamburg: Aargauer Kunsthaus / Ernst Barlach Haus Hamburg, erschienen im Verlag Scheidegger & Spiess AG Zürich 2016.

Die zur Ausstellung erscheinende, reich bebilderte, deutschsprachige Publikation enthält Essays von Carolin Lange, Thomas Hunkeler, Rüdiger Joppien, Ulrich Kaiser, Peter Suter, Thomas Schmutz und Friederike Weimar. Mit einer Einführung von Madeleine Schuppli und Karsten Müller. Der Katalog umfasst 200 Seiten und wurde von Anne Hoffmann Graphic Design, Zürich gestaltet.

Öffnungszeiten Di-So 10 – 17 Uhr, Do 10 – 20 Uhr

www.aargauerkunsthaus.ch

Location:
Aargauer Kunsthaus
Aargauerplatz
5001 Aarau
Switzerland

0 Comments

Leave a reply

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

© likeyou artnetwork / www.likeyou.com / Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account