Exhibition

in Küsnacht ZH / Switzerland
11.12.2015 - 23.01.2016 11:00 - 18:00
Jürgen Krause, Jugoslav Mitevski, Paulo Monteiro - paint.specific

“paint” in “paint.specific” refers to the material and to the action of the painter. “specific” in “paint.specific” refers to the object and the sculpture in the tradition of minimal art. “paint.specific” means Jürgen Krause, Jugoslav Mitevski and Paulo Monteiro: three artists, who consciously and intuitively allow their knowledge of the principles and contradictions of minimal art and post-minimalism flow into their work, yet who refuse to be hemmed in by linguistic conventions, definitions and dogmas. All three are primarily concerned with the considered manual development of the individual work; with the choice of material; and therefore with the concomitant actions and decisions that lead, in the end and in many respects, to a transformation.

Paulo Monteiro is a materials virtuoso. Combining painting and sculpture, he extends painting into the space. His works are informally arranged – choreographed, as it were – on the wall and around the room, whereby each individual item is representative of the whole and vice versa. The palette of his oil paintings is broad, ranging from powerful, luminous hues to muted pastels, plus black and white. His spectrum of shapes is limited: soft outlines and lines in delicate and thickened shapes predominate in his sculptures, as well as in his colour field paintings. The hand of the artist – his gesture – is plainly in evidence. In his paintings, it strokes and layers the paint, exposes it, pushes it up, dabs and pulls it using a brush, drawing lines over colour fields; in his sculptures, it kneads, cuts, sticks and compresses the material to form shapes – in the case of bronze, it sometimes applies a monochrome coating to it after it has been cast. Painting and sculpture are treated equally and, like his sculptures, the paintings are imbued with a corporeality that is very much in evidence: to Monteiro’s credit, this physicality never appears auratic, seeming instead to have emerged from life itself.

Jugoslav Mitevski has opted for a very particular way of exploring what painting can be today; the material he chooses is highly representative of the industrial production process used by minimal art, with its rejection of all things pictorial: concrete. He pours it – sometimes mixed with a pigment – into wooden moulds the size of the average picture panel, sometimes preparing or structuring the bottom of the mould with adhesive foil, clay or a reinforcing mesh. What happens on the bottom of the mould during the pouring can later be seen on the surface of the dried slab. If the film creates folds, the surface has a certain restlessness about it; if the mould still exhibits traces of the colour or indentations of the previous slab, then these appear, barely perceptibly, on the ensuing slab’s surface. Based on experience, the artist is able to steer and influence these phenomena to a certain extent, but not the overall end result of the work: part of it is down to the material’s drying process. This relinquishment of decision-making and the relative unpredictability of the final outcome lead to a sense of liberation within the creative process, motivating Mitevski to continuous modifications. There are slabs which he afterwards sprays or coats with paint; there are slabs with cut-outs created by drawing his thumb through the wet material; slabs brutally broken when dry in order to be integrated within a new slab; and slabs that go beyond the intrinsic painterly encounter with the surface, where the artist has used recesses and layerings to emphasise the object’s character, affording the viewer a glimpse of sides. His is a flowing, evolving work process involving intuition and reason in equal measure, one which is open to moods as well as to outside influences and stimuli.

Jürgen Krause‘s preoccupation with painting is focused on the priming, a craft that has been practised by painters for centuries. Krause prepares the primer himself every morning using rabbit-skin glue, white pigment, egg yolk and alum. He uses a brush to apply it to a sheet of paper. Allowing each coat to dry, he is able to apply between six and eight coats a day. He applies the size to both sides of the sheet over a period of days, weeks and months, watching it grow into a white, raggedy edged block. Through sheer endless repetition of one and the same gesture, what emerges is a sculptural object – additive, spreading out into the room, up to 20 kg in weight. What would normally follow the application of this traditional primer, i.e. the paint coat, is not applied. Instead, the preparation process itself becomes the main activity and outcome at one and the same time, although Krause is not so much concerned with the outcome as with the activity which, performed over and over again, becomes a meditative practice. This finds the artist, as Jean-Christophe Ammann puts it so well, compressing time, “… as if he were seeking to fuse the atom. He imbues meditative time with a gravitational force, which he builds from the inside out.” Krause adopts the opposite strategy with his work group “Werkzeuge” (Tools), in which material is rather subtracted than added. Appropriately enough he takes a sculptor’s tool, such as a chisel, and sharpens its blade on a whetstone, then blunts it, in order to sharpen it again. He performs this activity, which he has been learning from a Japanese knife sharpener for years, every day over a period of years, until only a small part of the blade is left. The activity requires a great deal of concentration, adequate breathing and mindfulness, to prevent the blade from breaking. As with the Primer, what is left is an object with a ciphered trajectory, the expression of a preparative activity that fulfils no purpose.

Jürgen Krause (*1971 Tettnang, DE) lives and works in Frankfurt/M.. He studied at the Akademie für Bildende Künste, Mainz and, under Thomas Bayrle, at the Städelschule, Frankfurt/M.. Selected solo exhibitions: “Jürgen Krause”, Museum Wiesbaden, 2013; “Jürgen Krause: Grundierungen”, Bischoff Projects, Frankfurt/M., 2012; “Jürgen Krause: Arbeiten”, Kunstverein Nürnberg, 2005. Krause’s work has been seen in numerous group exhibitions: “Disegno”, Kupferstich-Kabinett, Dresden, 2015, “Making Something”, Kunstverein Leipzig, 2015, “Alle Zeit der Welt”, Kunsthalle Mainz, 2008; 9th Triennial of Small-Scale Sculpture, Fellbach, 2009 where he received the Ludwig Gies Prize.

Jugoslav Mitevski (*1978 Brackenheim, DE) has been living and working in Berlin since August 2015, having come there via New York and Cologne. Mitevski studied Architecture at the HFT, Stuttgart (2000-02), then Fine Arts at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Braunschweig (2002-2008), interrupted by a year of studies at Birmingham City University. He has received numerous grants and awards. He has had solo exhibitions at the Artothek, Cologne and Petra Rinck Gallery, Düsseldorf, 2015; Ana Cristea Gallery, New York, 2014; Polistar, Istanbul, 2012. Selected group exhibitions: “Editionen”, Bonner Kunstverein, 2013; “Leinen los!”, Kunstverein Hannover, 2010; “Silence is appreciated but rather overestimated”, Manzara Perspectives, Istanbul, 2009.

Paulo Monteiro (*1961 São Paulo, BR) lives and works in São Paulo. He studied Art at the Faculdade de Belas Artes de São Paulo. His work has been seen in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including: “Empty House Casa Vazia”, Luhring Augustine, New York, 2015; “Paintings on Paper”, David Zwirner, New York, 2014; “Where Were You”, Lisson Gallery, London, 2014; “Paulo Monteiro”, Mendes Wood DM, São Paulo, 2013; “Paulo Monteiro”, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo, 2008; “Modernité”, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, 1987. Monteiro’s work may be found in prestigious museum collections, including those of MoMA – Museum of Modern Art, New York; MAM-SP Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo; MAM-RJ – Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro; Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo; Biblioteca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro; Museu Nacional de Brasilia; Museu de Arte Contemporanea Niterói, Rio de Janeiro.

Curated by Melanie Dankbar.

Opening hours Wed-Fri 11 am – 6 pm, Sat 11 am – 5 pm, and by appointment
Holiday closing times: 21 December 2015 – 4 January 2016 inclusive

“paint.specific” meint mit “paint” das Material und mit “paint” die Handlung des Malers. “paint. specific” meint mit “specific” das Objekt und die Skulptur in der Tradition der Minimal Art. “paint.specific” meint Jürgen Krause, Jugoslav Mitevski und Paulo Monteiro: Drei Künstler, die bewusst und intuitiv das Wissen um die Entwicklungen und Widersprüchlichkeiten der Minimal Art und des Post-Minimalismus in ihre Werke einfliessen lassen, sich aber nicht mit sprachlichen Abgrenzungen, Definitionen und Dogmen aufhalten. Im Vordergrund steht bei allen dreien die sorgfältige manuelle Entwicklung des einzelnen Werkes sowie das gewählte Material und die damit einhergehenden Handlungen und Entscheidungen, die am Ende in mehrfacher Hinsicht zu einer Zustandsveränderung führen.

Paulo Monteiro ist ein Virtuose des Materials. Er verbindet Malerei mit Skulptur, er entgrenzt die Malerei und erweitert sie in den Raum hinein. Seine Werke sind locker auf der Wand und im Raum arrangiert, gleich einer Choreografie, bei der das Einzelne für das Ganze von Bedeutung ist und das Ganze für das Einzelne. Die Farbpalette seiner Ölbilder ist breit und reicht von kräftigen, leuchtenden Farben über zarte Pastelltöne bis hin zu Weiss und Schwarz. Das Spektrum der Formen ist begrenzt, wobei weiche Umrisse und die Linie in zarter und verdickter Form sowohl bei den Skulpturen vorherrschen als auch bei den durch wenige Farbflächen bestimmten Ölbildern. Die Hand des Künstlers ist als Geste stets nachvollziehbar. Bei den Gemälden streicht und schichtet sie Farbe, legt sie frei, schiebt sie hoch, tupft und zieht sie mit einem Pinsel in Linien über Farbfelder; bei den Skulpturen knetet, schneidet, klebt und drückt sie das Material in Form – ist es Bronze, dann verleiht sie ihr manchmal nach dem Guss noch einen monochromen Anstrich. Malerei und Skulptur werden gleich behandelt und den Gemälden haftet genauso wie den Skulpturen eine Körperlichkeit an, die für den Ausstellungsbesucher erfahrbar ist und niemals, und das ist ein besonderes Verdienst Monteiros, auratisch daher kommt, sondern dem Leben entsprungen zu sein scheint.

Jugoslav Mitevski geht auf ungewöhnliche Weise der Frage nach, was Malerei heute sein kann und hat sich dafür ein Material erschlossen, das par excellence für die industriellen Herstellungs- prozesse der bildablehnenden Minimal Art steht: Beton. Diesen giesst er, teilweise mit Pigment vermischt, in tafelbildgrosse Holzverschalungen, deren Boden er manchmal zuvor mit Klebefolie, Ton oder Armierungsgitter bearbeitet beziehungsweise strukturiert hat. Das, was am Boden der Verschalung während des Giessens des Betons passiert, ist später auf der Oberfläche der getrockneten Platten zu sehen. Schlägt die Folie am Boden Falten, ist die Oberfläche unruhig bewegt, sind noch Farbspuren oder Abdrücke der vorherigen Platte in der Verschalung, dann werden sie wie ein Hauch auf die nächste Plattenfläche transferiert. Diese Vorgänge kann der Künstler bis zu einem gewissen Grad aufgrund seiner Erfahrung steuern und beeinflussen, die komplette Ausgestaltung der Arbeit kann er jedoch nicht bestimmen, ein Teil bleibt dem Trocknungsprozess des Materials überlassen. Dieses Loslassen von der Entscheidungsgewalt und das Nichtwissen über das finale Werk führen zu einer Befreiung innerhalb des Schaffensprozesses und treiben Mitevski zu immer neuen Modifikationen an. Es gibt Werke, die im nachhinein mit Spray- oder Lackfarbe bearbeitet werden, es gibt durchbrochene Platten, bei denen das flüssige Material mit dem Daumen durchfurcht wurde, es gibt Platten, die im trockenen Zustand brutal gebrochen wurden, um dann in eine neue Platte integriert zu werden und es gibt Platten, die über die immanent malerische Auseinandersetzung mit der Bildfläche hinausgehen, indem durch Aussparungen oder Schichtungen der Objektcharakter stärker betont wird und zum Blick auf die Seiten auffordert. Es ist ein fliessender, sich entwickelnder Arbeitsprozess, für den Intuition und Ratio gleichbedeu- tend sind und der offen ist für Stimmungen sowie für Einflüsse und Anregungen von aussen.

Jürgen Krauses Beschäftigung mit der Malerei konzentriert sich auf die Grundierung und zwar auf die Grundierung, wie sie seit Jahrhunderten zum Handwerk des Malers gehört. Krause mischt die Masse, bestehend aus Hasenleim, Weisspigment, Eigelb und Alaun, jeden Morgen selbst an. Mit einem Pinsel bestreicht er dann ein Blatt Papier damit. Sechs bis acht Schichten kann er, unterbrochen durch den Trocknungsprozess, pro Tag auftragen. Über Tage, Wochen und Monate trägt er die Schichten beidseitig auf und es wächst ein an den Rändern ausgefranster weisser Block heran. Durch die schier endlose Wiederholung ein und derselben Geste entsteht ein skulpturales Objekt, additiv, sich in den Raum ausbreitend, bis zu 20 kg schwer. Das, was auf die klassische Grundierung üblicherweise folgen würde, nämlich der Farbauftrag, bleibt aus. Die Vorbereitung ist vielmehr zur eigentlichen Handlung und zum Ergebnis geworden, wobei es Krause nicht um das Ergebnis geht, sondern um die Handlung selbst, die wieder und wieder ausgeübt, zu einem meditativen Üben wird. Krause verdichtet damit, wie Jean-Christophe Ammann treffend schrieb, die Zeit, “… als würde er Atome zusammenschweissen. Er gibt der meditativen Zeit eine Schwerkraft, dir er von innen nach aussen baut”. Genau umgekehrt geht Krause bei der Werkgruppe der “Werkzeuge” vor, bei der Material nicht additiv aufgebaut, sondern subtrahiert wird. Hierfür nimmt er sich sinnigerweise ein Bildhauerwerkzeug, z. B. einen Stechbeitel, vor und schärft dessen Klinge auf einem Schleifstein, um dann wieder Schärfe rauszunehmen. Diese Tätigkeit, die er bei einem japanischen Messerschleifer seit Jahren lernt, wird ebenfalls jeden Tag und über Jahre ausgeführt, bis nur noch ein Bruchteil der Klinge vorhanden ist. Die Tätigkeit verlangt hohe Konzentration, die richtige Atmung und Geisteshaltung, damit die Klinge nicht bricht. Wie bei der Grundierung bleibt am Ende ein Objekt, dessen Werdegang verschlüsselt ist und das Ausdruck einer vorbereitenden Handlung ist, die keinen Zweck erfüllt.

Jürgen Krause (*1971 Tettnang, DE) lebt und arbeitet in Frankfurt/M. Er studierte an der Akademie für Bildende Künste in Mainz und an der Städelschule in Frankfurt/M. (bei Thomas Bayrle). Ausgewählte Einzelausstellungen: “Jürgen Krause”, Museum Wiesbaden, 2013; “Jürgen Krause: Grundierungen”, Bischoff Projects, Frankfurt/M., 2012; “Jürgen Krause: Arbeiten”, Kunstverein Nürnberg, 2005. Krause war in zahlreichen Gruppenausstellungen vertreten: “Disegno”, Kupferstich-Kabinett, Dresden, 2015, “Making Something”, Kunstverein Leipzig, 2015, “Alle Zeit der Welt”, Kunsthalle Mainz, 2008; 9. Triennale für Kleinplastik, Fellbach, 2009, wo er den Ludwig Gies-Preis erhielt.

Jugoslav Mitevski (*1978 Brackenheim, DE) lebt und arbeitet seit August 2015 in Berlin, zuvor in New York und Köln. Mitevski studierte von 2000-02 Architektur an der HFT in Stuttgart, 2002-2008 Studium Freie Kunst an der Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Braunschweig, unterbrochen von einem Studienjahr an der Birmingham City University. Er erhielt zahlreiche Stipendien und Auszeichnungen. Einzelausstellungen hatte er 2015 in der Artothek, Köln sowie in der Petra Rinck Galerie, Düsseldorf; ausserdem in der Ana Cristea Gallery, New York, 2014; Polistar, Istanbul, 2012. Ausgewählte Gruppenausstellungen: “Editionen”, Bonner Kunstverein, 2013; “Leinen los!”, Kunstverein Hannover, 2010; “Silence is appreciated but rather overestimated”, Manzara Perspectives, Istanbul, 2009.

Paulo Monteiro (*1961, São Paulo, BR) lebt und arbeitet in São Paulo. Er studierte Kunst an der Faculdade de Belas Artes de São Paulo. Seine Werke wurden in zahlreichen Einzel- und Gruppenausstellungen gezeigt; u.a.: “Empty House Casa Vazia”, Luhring Augustine, New York, 2015; “Paintings on Paper”, David Zwirner, New York, 2014; “Where Were You”, Lisson Gallery, London, 2014; “Paulo Monteiro”, Mendes Wood DM, São Paulo, 2013; “Paulo Monteiro”, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo, 2008; “Modernité”, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, 1987. Monteiros Werke finden sich in bedeutenden Museumssammlungen, u.a. MoMA – Museum of Modern Art, New York; MAM-SP Museu de Arte Moderna des São Paulo; MAM-RJ – Museu de Arte Moderna do Rio de Janeiro; der Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo; Biblioteca Nacional, Rio de Janeiro; Museo Nacional de Brasilia; Museo de Arte Contemporanea Niterói, Rio de Janeiro.

Kuratiert von Melanie Dankbar.

Öffnungszeiten Mi-Fr 11 – 18 Uhr, Sa 11 – 17 Uhr, und nach Verabredung
Die Galerie bleibt vom 21. Dezember 2015 – 4 Januar 2016 geschlossen.

www.grieder-contemporary.com

Location:
Grieder Contemporary
Lärchentobelstrasse 25
8700 Küsnacht
Switzerland

0 Comments

Leave a reply

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

© likeyou artnetwork / www.likeyou.com / Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account